TV

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General

See also Video


total mess, collated from three articles, to sort



  • Phasor - a demo running on a custom minimalistic ATmega88-based demo platform that generates a composite video signal (PAL).




  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slow-scan_television - a picture transmission method used mainly by amateur radio operators, to transmit and receive static pictures via radio in monochrome or color. A literal term for SSTV is narrowband television. Analog broadcast television requires at least 6 MHz wide channels, because it transmits 25 or 30 picture frames per second (in the NTSC, PAL or SECAM color systems), but SSTV usually only takes up to a maximum of 3 kHz of bandwidth. It is a much slower method of still picture transmission, usually taking from about eight seconds to a couple of minutes, depending on the mode used, to transmit one image frame. Since SSTV systems operate on voice frequencies, amateurs use it on shortwave (also known as HF by amateur radio operators), VHF and UHF radio.




  • TV Fool - We offer several resources here relating to over-the-air (OTA) broadcast services (TV, FM, and others). We have a variety of online tools, downloadable content, reference information, and discussion forums to help users learn, understand, and make informed decisions about the OTA services available to them.





Amateur television

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_television - the transmission of broadcast quality video and audio over the wide range of frequencies of radio waves allocated for radio amateur (Ham) use. ATV is used for non-commercial experimentation, pleasure, and public service events. Ham TV stations were on the air in many cities before commercial television stations came on the air. Various transmission standards are used, these include the broadcast transmission standards of NTSC in North America and Japan, and PAL or SECAM elsewhere, utilizing the full refresh rates of those standards. ATV includes the study of building of such transmitters and receivers, and the study of radio propagation of signals travelling between transmitting and receiving stations. ATV is an extension of amateur radio. It is also called HAM TV or fast-scan TV (FSTV), as opposed to slow-scan television (SSTV). SSTV is a method of transmitting still images over radio, when it is not possible to send video.


Digital TV

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Video_Broadcasting - a set of international open standards for digital television. DVB standards are maintained by the DVB Project, an international industry consortium,[1] and are published by a Joint Technical Committee (JTC) of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC) and European Broadcasting Union (EBU).

Terrestrial

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_terrestrial_television - a technology for terrestrial television in which land-based (terrestrial) television stations broadcast television content by radio waves to televisions in consumers' residences in a digital format. DTTV is a major technological advance over the previous analog television, and has largely replaced analog which had been in common use since the middle of the 20th century. Test broadcasts began in 1998 with the changeover to DTTV (aka Analog Switchoff (ASO) or Digital Switchover (DSO)) beginning in 2006 and is now complete in many countries. The advantages of digital terrestrial television are similar to those obtained by digitising platforms such as cable TV, satellite, and telecommunications: more efficient use of limited radio spectrum bandwidth, provision of more television channels than analog, better quality images, and potentially lower operating costs for broadcasters (after the initial upgrade costs).


  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVB-T - an abbreviation for "Digital Video Broadcasting — Terrestrial"; it is the DVB European-based consortium standard for the broadcast transmission of digital terrestrial television that was first published in 1997[1] and first broadcast in the UK in 1998.[1] This system transmits compressed digital audio, digital video and other data in an MPEG transport stream, using coded orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (COFDM or OFDM) modulation. It is also the format widely used worldwide (including North America) for Electronic News Gathering for transmission of video and audio from a mobile newsgathering vehicle to a central receive point. It is also used in the US by Amateur television operators.


  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVB-T2 - an abbreviation for "Digital Video Broadcasting — Second Generation Terrestrial"; it is the extension of the television standard DVB-T, issued by the consortium DVB, devised for the broadcast transmission of digital terrestrial television. DVB has been standardized by ETSI.This system transmits compressed digital audio, video, and other data in "physical layer pipes" (PLPs), using OFDM modulation with concatenated channel coding and interleaving. The higher offered bit rate, with respect to its predecessor DVB-T, makes it a system suited for carrying HDTV signals on the terrestrial TV channel (though many broadcasters still use plain DVB-T for this purpose). As of 2014, it was implemented in broadcasts in the United Kingdom (Freeview HD, eight channels across two multiplexes, plus an extra multiplex in Northern Ireland carrying three SD channels), Italy (Europa 7 HD, twelve channels), Finland (21 channels, five in HD), Germany (six HD (1080p50) channels, with 40 in planning), the Netherlands (Digitenne, 30 HD (1080p50) channels), Sweden (five channels), Thailand (41 SD, 9 HD channels) Flanders (18 SD Channels), Serbia (eight channels), Ukraine (32 SD and HD channels in four nationwide multiplexes), Croatia (two pay-TV multiplexes, one experimental multiplex to be used for regular TV broadcasting in HEVC and 1080p50 once legacy DVB-T transmissions cease), Denmark (two pay-TV multiplexes with 20 channels), Romania (8 SD channels, 1 HD channel) and some other countries.



  • ukfree.tv - Freeview and Freeview HD information


Satellite

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVB-S - the original DVB standard for Satellite Television and dates from 1995, in its first release, while development lasted from 1993 to 1997. The first commercial application was by Galaxy in Australia, enabling digitally broadcast, satellite-delivered Television to the public.It is used via satellites serving every continent of the world. DVB-S is used in both Multiple Channel Per Carrier (MCPC) and Single channel per carrier modes for Broadcast Network feeds as well as for direct-broadcast satellite services like Sky (UK & Ireland) via Astra in Europe, Dish Network and Globecast in the U.S. and Bell TV in Canada.While the actual DVB-S standard only specifies physical link characteristics and framing, the overlaid transport stream delivered by DVB-S is mandated as MPEG-2, known as MPEG transport stream (MPEG-TS).Some amateur television repeaters also use this mode in the 1.2 GHz amateur band.

Linux

  • LinuxTV.org - Television with Linux - develops and maintains the Linux Kernel Media Subsystems and several userspace libraries and applications.The Linux Kernel Media Subsystems provide support for devices like webcams, streaming capture and output, analog TV, digital TV, AM/FM radio, Sofware Digital Radio (SDR), remote controllers and encoders/decoders for compressed video formats. It offers native support for a large number of drivers for commonly available PCI cards and USB devices, but the subsystems are also targeted towards Linux based set-top-boxes and embedded devices like mobile phones.



  • UV4L - UV4L was originally conceived as a modular collection of Video4Linux2-compliant, cross-platform, user space drivers for real or virtual video input and output devices (with absolutely no external difference from kernel drivers). While still preserving the original intentions, UV4L has evolved over the years and now optionally includes a generic purpose Streaming Server plug-in, especially made for IoT devices, that can serve custom web applications that can make use of a number of standard and modern built-in services for Real-Time Communications such as encrypted, bidirectional data channels, audio and video streaming or conferencing over the web. UV4L also provides a RESTful API for the developers who want to implement their own custom applications.


w_scan -ft -c [country_code] > ~/channels.conf



Viewing








  • MythTV - a Free Open Source software digital video recorder (DVR) project distributed under the terms of the GNU GPL. It has been under heavy development since 2002, and now contains most features one would expect from a good DVR (and many new ones that you soon won't be able to live without).



  • Tvheadend - a TV streaming server and recorder for Linux, FreeBSD and Android supporting DVB-S, DVB-S2, DVB-C, DVB-T, ATSC, ISDB-T, IPTV, SAT>IP and HDHomeRun as input sources. Tvheadend offers the HTTP (VLC, MPlayer), HTSP (Kodi, Movian) and SAT>IP streaming. Multiple EPG sources are supported (over-the-air DVB and ATSC including OpenTV DVB extensions, XMLTV, PyXML). The Analog video (V4L) is supported directly up to version 3.4.In recent version, the pipe:// source (in IPTV network) might be used to obtain the MPEG-TS stream generated by ffmpeg/libav from a V4L device.


  • NextPVR - a personal video recorder application for Microsoft Windows, Linux, Mac and Docker. NextPVR makes it easy to watch or record live TV, and provides great features like series recordings, web scheduling, iPhone/iPad client application, Kodi/Emby integration etc. NextPVR is free for personal, non-commercial use. Commercial use requires a license.

DVR / PVR

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_video_recorder - an electronic device that records video in a digital format to a disk drive, USB flash drive, SD memory card, SSD or other local or networked mass storage device. The term includes set-top boxes with direct to disk recording, portable media players and TV gateways with recording capability, and digital camcorders. Personal computers are often connected to video capture devices and used as DVRs; in such cases the application software used to record video is an integral part of the DVR. Many DVRs are classified as consumer electronic devices; such devices may alternatively be referred to as personal video recorders (PVRs), particularly in Canada.


MythTV

VDR

Sage

NextPVR

CouchPotato

  • CouchPotato - PVR for usenet and torrents. Just fill in what you want to see and CouchPotato will add it to your "want to watch"-list. Every day it will search through multiple NZBs & Torrents sites, looking for the best possible match. If available, it will download it using your favorite download software.

Sonarr

  • Sonarr - a PVR for Usenet and BitTorrent users. It can monitor multiple RSS feeds for new episodes of your favorite shows and will grab, sort and rename them. It can also be configured to automatically upgrade the quality of files already downloaded when a better quality format becomes available.

Sick Beard

  • Sick Beard - a PVR for newsgroup users (with limited torrent support). It watches for new episodes of your favorite shows and when they are posted it downloads them, sorts and renames them, and optionally generates metadata for them. It currently supports NZBs.org, NZBMatrix, NZBs'R'Us, Newzbin, Womble's Index, NZB.su, TVTorrents and EZRSS and retrieves show information from theTVDB.com and TVRage.com.

SiCKRAGE

  • SiCKRAGE - Automatic Video Library Manager for TV Shows

Streaming services
















  • QMagneto - an EPG (Electronic Program Guide) which displays current and future TV programs. It can also program the recording of broadcasts by calling an external program like VLC or mencoder. It is possible to record programs from a BOX (French Neufbox or Freebox) or a DVB-T device.



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