Geology

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General

  • SEG Wiki - Home to hundreds of biographies of key geoscientists, geophysical tutorials, and core content from the science of applied geophysics


  • Mindat.org - the world’s leading authority on minerals and their localities, deposits, and mines worldwide. Mindat.org’s mission is to advance the world’s understanding of minerals. Mindat.org has been collecting, organising, and sharing mineral information since October 2000. It is now an essential resource used daily throughout education, academia, and industry. An international team of 50 expert managers work to ensure accuracy. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, mindat.org relies on support from both companies and individuals.

Earth

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asthenosphere - the highly viscous, mechanically weak and ductilely deforming region of the upper mantle of the Earth. It lies below the lithosphere, at depths between approximately 80 and 200 km (50 and 120 miles) below the surface. The Lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundary is usually referred to as LAB. The asthenosphere is almost solid, although some of its regions could be molten (e.g., below mid-ocean ridges). The lower boundary of the asthenosphere is not well defined. The thickness of the asthenosphere depends mainly on the temperature. However, the rheology of the asthenosphere also depends on the rate of deformation, which suggests that the asthenosphere could be also formed as a result of a high rate of deformation. In some regions the asthenosphere could extend as deep as 700 km (430 mi). It is considered the source region of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB).